Tag Archives: Recipes

Time Consuming (worth it) Beet Burgers

12 Aug

Burger1

I don’t care if it’s Summer, I love beets. Even the ungodly things they do to my…inner-workings, I accept beets for who they are. I have been getting emails from The Kitchn for a while, and to be honest I don’t remember how why or when I signed up. The recipes always make me stop and read through, but I finally decided to jump in and actually MAKE something and yowza, it was the right thing to do my friends. I have 100000 other things off this site bookmarked now, so….be ready for that.

I am always on the lookout for a great veggie burger. Why? I don’t know. I love meat, but maybe it’s just the promise of lots of non-meat items coming together to create a flavor-punch patty that’s just too tempting to get out of my head? Either way, I came across this and decided yes, this is for me.

{ Best Ever Veggie Burgers – The Kitchn }

And with a title like that, who could turn it down? I made these on a day when I needed to feel that I accomplished something, anything, and with good reason. Let me set the scene…

The day: Saturday after the Michigan Summer Beer Festival in Ypsilanti

The time: directly after seeing Pacific Rim IN 3D IMAX (a great way to turn off your brain for 1.5 hours)

The feeling: not quite human yet

(If you glance below, you can see just how much fun I’m having with my snazzy Bell’s glasses and mini “tasting” cup)

Beer

It was time to roll up my sleeves, chug some water, and get down to non-meat burgers. Wrap some beets in tinfoil, put them in the oven and forget about them for a while.

CookedBeets

Meanwhile over cook some brown rice, and caramelize some onions with cider vinegar (for extra sweetness)

Onions

Find an old bag of oatmeal (that happens to have lots of good stuff like flax seed and whatnot), or just some regular old oats, and give it a nice grind into a flower-like consistency (and doing this you learn that your ALREADY AWESOME immersion blender has an attachment like a mini food processor. Things are comin’ up Vitkin!)

 

Oats

OatGrind

Now hopefully your beets have been pulled out of the oven, peeled, cooled, and grated and placed in a bowl to await tasty additions. Such additions include black beans–both whole and pulverized WITH PRUNES (oyi my digestive system)–smoked paprika, dijon mustard, cumin, coriander, cooked rice, and sweetly cooked onions. Give her a good and strong mix. Now add that awesome oat flour you just made, and one lone egg.

PattyMix

Now let all the flavors get to know one another intimately in the fridge for a few hours, and then form into patties, and cook until a nice crust forms on each side

PattyCook

 

Those look good….but I wish they had cheese on them….

Cheese

 

Hurrah! Now place on your bun of choice (I chose english muffins because I had them, and that way I could have 2), and add some fixin’s

Toppings

 

Smash together (but not too hard, since we all know homemade veggie burgers tend to be somewhat mushy). Enjoy.

Burger

 

This recipe made a TON of food. I pattied 6 of them, and that wasn’t even half. I ended up tossing the rest in the skillet together to warm it through (I’m looking at you egg) and to give random places a little crust. I ate this delicious “mush” for the next 4 days topped with everything from avocado and cilantro to corn and tomatoes (and sometimes all of the above). Omit the egg and prepare thine self to WOW your vegan friends with your amazing culinary skillz.

Adapted from { Best Ever Veggie Burgers – The Kitchn }

  • 4 small beets
  • 1/2 cup brown rice (uncooked)
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced small
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup oats
  • 2 (15.5-ounce) cans black beans
  • 1/4 cup prunes, chopped into small pieces.
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons brown mustard
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander
  • 1 large egg
  • Salt and pepper
  1. Heat the oven to 400°F, wrap the beets loosely in aluminum foil and roast until easily pierced with a fork, 50 to 60 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  2. Meanwhile, bring a 2-quart pot of water to a boil. Salt the water generously and add the rice. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook the rice until it’s a little beyond al dente. You want it a little over-cooked, but still firm (not completely mushy). This should take about 35 to 40 minutes. Drain the rice and set it aside to cool.
  3. Heat a teaspoon of olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt. Stir the onions every minute or two, and cook until they are golden and getting charred around the edges, 10 to 12 minutes. A few wisps of smoke as you are cooking is ok, but if it seems that the onions are burning, lower the heat. A dark, sticky crust should develop on the bottom of the pan.
  4. Add the garlic and cook until it is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Pour in the cider vinegar and scrape up the dark sticky crust. Continue to simmer until the cider has evaporated and the pan is nearly dry again. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.
  5. Process the oats in a food processor until they have reduced to a fine flour. Transfer to a small bowl and set aside.
  6. Drain and rinse one of the cans of beans and transfer the beans to the food processor. Scatter the prunes on top. Pulse in 1-second bursts just until the beans are roughly chopped — not so long that they become mush — 8 to 10 pulses. Transfer this mixture to a large mixing bowl. Drain and rinse the second can of beans and add these whole beans to the mixing bowl as well.
  7. Use the edge of a spoon or a paper towel to scrape the skins off the cooled roasted beets; the skins should slip off easily. Grate the peeled beets on the largest holes of a box grater. Transfer the beet gratings to a strainer set over the sink. Press and squeeze the beet gratings to remove as much liquid as possible from the beets.
  8. Transfer the squeezed beets, cooked rice, and sautéed onions to the bowl with the beans. Sprinkle the olive oil, brown mustard, smoked paprika, cumin, and coriander over the top of the mixture. Mix all the ingredients until combined. Taste the mixture and add salt, pepper, or any additional spices or flavorings to taste. Finally, add the oatmeal flour and egg, and mix until you no longer see any dry oatmeal or egg.
  9. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap or transfer the mixture to a refrigerator container, and refrigerate the burger mixture for at least 2 hours.
  10. Heat a cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add a few tablespoons of vegetable oil to completely coat the bottom of the pan.
  11. Form patties and cook as many as will fit without crowding. Cook for 2-4 minutes per side (or until you see a nice crust).

Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market Feature: A-Picklin’ Bonanza

3 Jun

Board

Well well well, guess who’s featured on the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market blog again? Obviously it’s me because why would I non self-promote (I’m looking’ out for #1).

Pickled Market Veggies with Whitefish Spread – Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market

We have a new season full of fresh new veggies, and I thought “let’s brine ’em”, and brine ’em I did. I picked up some AMAZING Whitefish Spread from Bay Port Fish and decided to create a board around that (I was also fresh off my Charcuterie Board high). I was going to do asparagus, radishes, and swiss chard stems, but only ended up doing the first two because I wanted to make sure the brines were different enough for each type.

Once you start making fresh refrigerator pickles…there’s no stopping you.

  • Make a mixture of vinegar and water
  • Add some salt, sugar, and spices
  • Bring to a boil
  • Pour over desired vegetables
  • Let cool to room temperature
  • Pop in fridge for 48(ish) hours
  • Say “oh THESE pickled [vegetable name], no, they’re HOMEmade, I’m what you’d call a purist” while enjoying with an unsuspecting guest (however, don’t expect them to want to hang out with you again, this pickling knowledge has gone to your head!)

You can really play with the brine by selecting different types of vinegar (apple cider vinegar will give it a sweetness, while red wine vinegar will give it nice tang), and the herbs/spices you put in will also give great influence (you can go for classic dill, or maybe pair some cilantro and rice vinegar for an Asiany flair). And don’t forget, a pinch (or fistful) of crushed red pepper is always a nice addition for those who are into the spicy arts.

Final

 

To get the full recipes, check it out, and if you find yourself at the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market, grab some of that Whitefish Spread because day-um, it was soooooo good.

A Collection of Thoughts

24 May

I’ve been saving a few articles over the past few months until I thought I had enough to create a post you could really sink you teeth into and seeing how I’ve been too busy to put words to the preverbal paper (I’ve got the pictures and the meals under my belt, oh ho ho, don’t you worry), today seems to be the day.

Go For Greens when Spring Comes to Market – Detroit Free Press

  • Remember that post I did for the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market? Well apparently it sparked some interest in our neighbor to the East (I’m talking about Detroit, obviously) and someone from the Free Press came down to our quaint market to do a little more research. Now Entering Flavor Country: inspiring the hearts and minds of Southeast Michigan.

peashoots

 

10 Food That (Thankfully) Flopped – Neatorama

  • Some of these items are hilariously sad (a food product aimed at Single adults? Wasn’t that a staple of Edna Krabappel‘s diet?), and some of them were pulled before their time (I would get DOWN on some coffee-flavored Jell-O).

Flop

 

Eye Candy: 20 Visual Recipes – visual.ly

  • Food + Infographs = the perfect way to waste your afternoon

visaul

 

Healthy Baking Oil Substitutes – Excellent Eats

  • While this blog isn’t based necessarily around healthy cooking, I have used these tips quite a few times. And hey the less I have to refill my oil bottle the better (I purchased a giant tin canister of olive oil from Plum Market a while ago because it was $17 off!! However it makes the refill process of my pourable glass container quite messy)

OilSub

 

27 Ways to Make Your Groceries Last as Long as Possible – Buzzfeed

  • If I had a dollar for every time I had to throw out some produce…wait, it’s more like “if I threw away a dollar for every time…”

Groceries

 

World’s 50 Best Restaurants – Grub Street New York

  • I always love looking at these lists and planning out which ones I could conceivably go to even though we all know I’m too cheap to ever step foot in any of these establishments.

50

 

Why Your Dinner Doesn’t Taste as Good as it Looked Online – Buzzfeed

  • As a food blogger, this hit home. However, I now realize why my food photography doesn’t stack up against some of my “colleagues”, it’s because I spend MAYBE 90 seconds on my photo shoots because I’m ready to eat my camera by the time the food is ready. Bygones. 

tastespotting

Well, I hope this wasn’t too much of a cop out! I’ll be back (hopefully) soon a-posting away like I normally do, complaining about the impending heat and how much everything costs. Wow, I kind of suck, don’t I?

Chicken and Asparagus with Green Goddess Dressing

15 May

The first time I had Green Goddess dressing it was a vinaigrette with an olive oil base. Seeing as this was the first time I was trying it, I assumed no further investigation needed to take place as far as how authentic what I was putting into my mouth was. I noticed items adorned with Green Goddess dressing a few times after with a creamy version of this herby sauce. Well I guess that’s a way you can present it, if you want to muddy the waters I thought. After a few years of seeing this repeated offense, and coming across a tasty-looking recipe for a Green Goddess Chicken and Asparagus Salad this past weekend, a thought creeped into my head that stopped me dead in my tracks: what if I was the one who was wrong, and not society. It couldn’t be. Finally, after exhaustive research (read: a quick trip to wikipedia) I was hit with the harsh truth: Green Goddess Dressing is a cream-based sauce. I was operating under false pretenses for years. I had no choice but to man up, and follow the crowd.

[ That was a Dramatic Reenactment for entertainment purposes, certain liberties were taken for exciting embellishment ]

Asparagus

So guess what? It’s asparagus season! I was about to barrel into a story about how I don’t smell Asparagus pee, but guess what, I’ve already talked about it. I am charming. This time of year I try to eat AT LEAST a solid pound of Asparagus a week because it’s delicious, it’s fresh, and the price is right. See that picture above? I took that at the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market and all I wanted to do was get on that vendor table and start rolling around. But I digress…. I was flipping through some handy books of cooking, and came across a recipe that not only utilized my favorite speary Spring vegetable, but also was heavy handed with my favorite herb: Dill (…I feel a Dill post coming on soon…)

{ Green Goddess Dressing with Chicken and Asparagus – Simply Organic by Jesse Ziff Cool }

PlatterClose

Here’s the jist: Take some asparagus and blanche it for 2-3 minutes (I like mine with a little snap left in it), take some chicken (I opted for a grocery store rotisserie chicken, de-skinned and shredded), put them together to await saucing.

ChickenAsparagus

Take yer greens (parsley, dill, garlic, green onions) and whizz them around in a food processor

Herbs

ChoppedHerbs

Got some Basil or spinach or anything else fresh? Go ahead and toss it in. Everybody in the pool! Now add and mixture of sour cream/buttermilk/yogurt and some salt and pepper. Give it another whizzing.

CreamyDress

Now coat those your Chicken and Asparagus, and serve over some chopped greens (for me: Red leaf lettuce).

PlatterSide

Since there is raw garlic and raw green onion in the dressing get ready for a blast of fire with your first (and subsequent) bites. Oh boy, just delightful. The perfect fresh, Springy, filling-yet-light meal I could have hoped for.

While I won’t post the exact recipe here, I found a recipe adapted from the original here.

Platter

Happy Asparagusing!

 

Nothing Says “Happy Easter” Like A Smoked Salmon Platter

31 Mar

EasterHappy Easter! While I’m not making a fancy holiday meal today (I have to get ready for Game of Thrones tonight, duh), we started the day with a platter of Smoked Salmon (with fresh dill, pea shoots, hard boiled egg, red onion, tomatoes, and an assortment of toasted bagels and english muffins), lots of fruit (clementines, bananas, grapes, mangoes, and apples), and some roasted asparagus for good measure.

Hangover? What hangover! Uh…I mean Happy Easter!

Easter1{ yes, that’s an Obama mug }

 

 

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