Tag Archives: Farmer’s Market

Thai Inspired Tomato Soup, Roasted Corn with Manchego, and Cabbage Wrapped Whitefish

29 Aug

What a mouthful! It has been some time since I devoted a whole evening or afternoon to cooking, so I decided to change that, especially when all this amazing produce is fresh and ripe and at my fingertips. After I spent a few hours looking through a few year’s worth of Bon Apetit magazines, I settled on 3 recipes I wanted to try. Two of them really worked together, and one was not quite the same flavor profile, but whatevs.

Meal

Tomato and Crab Soup – Roasted Corn with Manchego and Lime – Savoy Cabbage Rolls with Halibut }

Stop me if you’ve heard this, but I don’t have the best of luck when it comes to fish at home. I always make the wrong decision at the heart of cooking (at the store) because whatever I’m looking for they don’t have, and then they don’t have a suitable substitute, or what I’m looking for is $30/lb and let’s be honest, there’s no way I can bring myself to spend that kind of money (especially since I’m sure I’d end up over thinking the actual cooking process, and end up ruining the fish…THE FISH I JUST SPENT $30 ON). But I digress…

Let’s make some soup! So this is an interesting take on a tomato soup, using fresh Thai-like ingredients like coconut milk, fish sauce, and lemongrass. When using lemon grass in the past I’ve smashed it, and added it to soups, only to be taken out before serving. This soup called for it to be sliced (not smashed, mind you), and sautéed with some onions as a starting base.

Lemongrass

 

One your aromatics are softened up, add your beautiful fresh and vibrant tomatoes

Tomatoes

 

Cook until those are starting to soften, then add your liquids (fish sauce, coconut milk, stock, and orange juice)

Soup

 

Let simmer for about 15 minutes for all the flavors to incorporate, then blend with a handy immersion blender. Add the juice of a lime and taste to adjust seasoning. Easy peasy.

For the corn, pop unhusked corn in the oven for about 15 minutes to give it a crisp-tender consistency

CornHusk

 

Unhusk corn (please wait until it cools, don’t try to be a hero like me….there is no way to look “cool” while trying to shuck hot steaming corn), and add to pan with heated oil. Season with salt and pepper

CornStir

 

Take off heat, and add a diced jalapeño, some red pepper flakes, and squeeze a lime over the whole thing. When cooled and ready to serve, grate some tasty TASTY Manchego cheese over the sweet bounty. I know I’ve sang the praises of the Plum Market cheese counter in the past, but man, they’re just the best. They were able to cut me down a nice $4 portion and it was plenty for this meal, and you know what, you can just tell they really love cheese!

And lastly, the fish. Peel off about 6 leaves of a Savoy cabbage and let simmer in salted water for about 2-3 minutes, until soft. Take out and plunge in ice water to stop cooking

CabbageIce

 

Sidenote: I now realize why my approach last September for stuffed cabbage wasn’t working. The recipe called for boiling water to be poured over the cabbage and let to sit for about 10 minutes…well that didn’t really do anything to soften up the leaves, yielding in snapping leaves and a frustrated Erica. Next time I’m definitely taking this approach of boiling the individual leaves…the more you know.

Now take your boiled/iced leaves and slice the thick part of the veins off (oh, and dry them off, no one wants a watery-fishy-stuffed cabbage situation). Mix some unsalted butter with chopped capers, salt, and pepper. Layer the leaves with a portion of fish and a healthy dose of caper butter

FishButter

 

Now gently GENTLY fold burrito-style until you have neat little packages

Wrap

 

Take you reminding caper butter and place over high heat

CaperButter

 

Give each of the little cabbage-fish-pouches a nice little sear on each side (about 2 min per side)

CabbagePan

 

Full disclosure, I was going to skip this part because doesn’t that just seem like a recipe for disaster? These rolls aren’t tucked, just placed together, but it was fine…somehow…I didn’t ask questions, I just seared and gently placed back on the baking sheet. Now finish in the oven for about 10 minutes, or until the fish is fully cooked. Now, being that I don’t often cook fish at home, I’m always unsettled at the cooking process because IT’S SO QUICK and I’m convinced that I’m going to be giving everyone who is eating some type of fish-related sickness from their underdone fish, but hey, I have a clean track record to date, so let’s not look into it.

Place your NON SICK INDUCING cabbage fish packets on your plate (oh yeah….really selling these aren’t I)

CabbageFish

 

Add some corn (with freshly grated Manchego) and some extra lime wedges

Corn

 

Ladle your soup into bowls and garnish with fresh sunflower shoots you grabbed at the Market, and grab a chunk of baguette or other crusty bread

TomatoSoup

 

And you got yourself a god damn meal

Meal

 

Now the fish was tender and tasty, but in no way matched the flavors of the other items….so I think I was just over excited to try the cabbage wraps that I overlooked the flavors. I also had every intention of adding cilantro to the soup and corn, which I totally forgot about. But you know what, this made a TON of food, so I was able to add some in future sittings.

This soup is now one of my favorites, and it’s good hot or cold. An out-of-this-world meal is the tomato soup, sunflower shoots, fresh cilantro and some of this corn all mixed together. Wow, I gorged myself on that for about 5 straight days. I also just made a HUGE batch of the soup to freeze for the winter months when fresh tomatoes are a thing of yore. This recipe also calls for a fun crab salad topping (reminiscent of my “Lobster” corn soup) but I opted out since I was making the fish. Next time, it’s crab time.

 

{ Tomato and Crab Soup – Bon Appetit, July 2008 }

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 5 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 stalks lemongrass, peeled, trimmed, thinly sliced
  • 1 Fresno or Thai chile, seeded, minced
  • 2 1/2 pounds beefsteak tomatoes, chopped (about 3 cups)
  • 2 1/4 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 3 tablespoons fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce (such as nam pla or nuoc nam)
  • 1 tablespoon (or more) fresh lime juice
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/2 pound fresh lump crabmeat
  • 3/4 cup pea tendrils or shoots, trimmed
  • 6 snow peas, trimmed, thinly sliced on diagonal
  • Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add scallions, lemongrass, and chile and cook until softened, 3-4 minutes. Add tomatoes and cook until softened, 5-6 minutes. Stir in chicken stock, coconut milk, orange juice, and fish sauce. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until flavors meld, about 15 minutes. Let cool slightly.
  • Working in batches, purée soup in a blender until smooth, about 1 minute per batch. Stir in 1 tablespoon lime juice. Season to taste with salt and more lime juice, if desired. Chill, if desired. Or ladle hot soup into wide shallow bowls. Garnish with crabmeat, pea tendrils, and snow peas.

{ Roasted Corn with Manchego and Lime – Bon Apetit, July 2011 }

  • 6 ears of sweet yellow corn, unhusked
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) unsalted butter
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 jalapeño, seeded, finely diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 lime, cut into 4 wedges
  • 1 cup finely grated Manchego cheese
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced chives
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lime zest
  • Preheat oven to 450°. Roast unhusked corn on a baking sheet, turning occasionally, until heated through and crisp-tender, about 15 minutes. Let cool. Shuck corn and cut kernels from cobs. Discard cobs.
  • Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Add corn kernels and sauté until heated through and light-golden in spots, 3-5 minutes. Add butter; stir until melted. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Transfer corn to a large wide bowl or deep platter; sprinkle jalapeño and crushed red pepper flakes over. Squeeze lime wedges over; sprinkle with cheese, chives, and lime zest.

{ Savoy Cabbage Rolls with Halibut – Bon Appetit }

  • Bring large pot of salted water to boil. Fill large bowl with ice cubes and water; set aside. Add cabbage leaves to boiling water; cook 2 minutes. Using slotted skimmer or large slotted spoon, transfer leaves to bowl of ice water to cool. Drain. Gently pat dry.
  • Place 4 tablespoons butter in small bowl. Chop 2 tablespoons capers and mix into bowl with butter, then stir in parsley. Season caper butter to taste with coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  • Place 1 cabbage leaf, vein side up, on work surface. Using small sharp knife, trim off some of thickest part of large center vein so that leaf will lie flat. Turn leaf over, vein side down. Place 1 fish fillet on bottom third of cabbage leaf. Sprinkle fish with coarse salt and pepper. Spread 1 tablespoon caper butter over fish. Fold bottom, then sides of leaf over fish. Fold tip of leaf over, enclosing fish completely. Place fish packet, seam side down, on rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with remaining cabbage leaves, fish, coarse salt, pepper, and caper butter. DO AHEAD Can be made 8 hours ahead. Cover and chill.
  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Sprinkle fish packets with coarse salt and pepper. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add fish packets to skillet and cook until cabbage is light golden, about 2 minutes per side. Return fish packets, seam side down, to same baking sheet. Bake until fish is just opaque in center and firm to touch, about 7 minutes.
  • Transfer fish packets to platter; cover with foil to keep warm. Place baking sheet over 2 burners on medium heat; add remaining 3 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons capers to baking sheet and cook until butter is golden brown, stirring constantly, 1 to 2 minutes. Add 2 teaspoons water to butter mixture and swirl to blend. Season sauce to taste with coarse salt and pepper. Spoon sauce over fish and serve.
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Chilled Corn Soup with “Lobster” Salad

2 Aug

Now that I’ve eaten my way through my savings with my constant intake of Burrata I knew I had to make some cutbacks for this refreshing and SUMMERY dish

{ Chilled Corn Soup with Lobster Salad – Bon Apetit }

FInal1

Yum. What about that doesn’t sound good? Nothing, that’s what.

Let’s go ahead and jump into a side note: On August 1 John and I celebrated our 1 year anniversary of moving to Ann Arbor, and I had a lot of different feelings about it. Has it already been a year? Why don’t I know more people yet? What would have happened if I spent the last year in Kalamazoo? Am I a better person? Well…let’s not get crazy. I feel I have definitely gone through some major changes over the year I’ve spent in my new home, the biggest of which I decided to start a blog about food, AND I ACTUALLY STUCK WITH IT. It was something I always wanted to do, and in the face of change, I decided to embrace and run (with it). Upon this retrospection, I looked back through some of my old posts, and yowza, there are some t-e-r-r-i-b-l-e photos on here, but it’s to be expected. I feel so amped at my portfolio of dishes, and I can’t wait to try some stuff that’s totally different (and I still need to use my canning system before Summer is over or else there goes $70 and prime shelf space).

Now I enjoy splurging on the occasional indulgent ingredient (Burrata, $25 Scallops, etc) however I just couldn’t bring myself to buy real lobster for this dish, especially when it’s not the “main event” (I could have said Maine, but I went the high road). I marched over to the seafood counter, and took a slight left, and headed to the prepared “fish” area…the area that holds the pickled and smoked items that come in jars and I was able to locate Krab (imitation crab, obvs). A mere 4 inches lower laid what I came for: imitation lobster (or what I like to call [k]lobster, pronounced clobster). It wasn’t my proudest moment, but man that $3.50 sure was nice to see…

First things first, let’s do some a-choppin

Chop

 

Sautee onions and garlic, then add your 6-cobs-worth of corn and heat until corn starts to soften.

CornOnions

 

Meanwhile let’s make this soup the corniest it can be by making….corn stock! Take yer cobs (or bones of the corn) and put them in a pot with extra celery, onions, onion skins, random mushrooms you found in the back of your fridge, a few carrots…..really whatever you have laying around. Cover the whole thing with water, bring to a boil, then turn down heat to a low boil for about an hour. Strain and reserve liquid for future corn-ings (or for this corn soup).

CornStock

Back to the corn and onions. Add fresh herbs (the recipe calls for thyme, but I like dill, and had dill, so I used dill) and 5 cups of HOMEMADE CORN STOCK or water, and bring to a rolling boil for about 10 minutes, or until your corn is all cooked.

SoupCook

Now we blend! Using my handy lovely sexy immersion blender, I whipped everything into a nice creamy puree, and took a step I’ve never taken before in soups: straining through a fine-mesh. I normally just keep all the bumps and lumps in the soup because hey, extra fiber, but I wanted something silky so I took that extra step. And guess what, corn soup puree doesn’t go through a fine-mesh sieve easily, so I had to hold it while Max kept whipping things around to find holes (yes yes I know how it sounds). But after what seemed like calendar months, the liquid was finally separated from the corn mush.

CornMush

 

I was feeling ambitious, so after I put the soup into the fridge to chill, I starting grabbing baking ingredients (flour, baking soda, blah blah) and I was intent on using this mush to make some sort of savory corn muffin. I lost steam after about 55 seconds because the TV was calling my name, and I had been neglecting it on account of all the corn stock. So I just had some spoon fills and let it go to waste like the asshole that I am.

On to the [k]Lobster salad! Whisk together lemon juice, shallot, and dijon. Slowly add olive oil, and season with salt and pepper. Add your celery leaves

CeleryLeaves

 

[k]Lobster and dill. Mix everything together.

KlobsterSalad

Guess what….[k]Lobster isn’t bad…it’s actually pretty good. WHO KNEW. Give this salad a pop in the fridge to crisp up a bit, then make some bowls, ladle your chilled silky smooth corn soup on in, and top with your fake seafood salad.

Final

 

I’m not going to lie to you. This soup was DA BOMB. The corn gave a distinct sweetness to the soup, while the dijon in the salad added just the right amount of bite to everything. The dill and celery leaves offor a refreshing flavor, and the [k]Lobster is just strutting about like he was actually $12/lb, which just adds the right amount of cockiness to the whole thing. Claws up!

 

Adapted from { Chilled Corn Soup with Lobster Salad – Bon Apetit } 

 

Corn Soup

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, finely chopped
  • 6 cups corn kernels (from 6 ears)
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  1. Heat butter and oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic and cook, stirring often, until softened and beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Add corn; season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until corn is softened and beginning to brown, 6–8 minutes.
  2. Add thyme sprigs and 5 cups water to pot. Bring corn mixture to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until corn is very soft, 10 minutes longer; discard thyme sprigs.
  3. Working in batches, purée corn mixture in a blender until smooth (or use an immersion blender in the pot). Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a large bowl, pressing on solids; discard solids. Transfer soup to a large bowl, cover, and chill until cold, at least 2 hours.

Lobster Salad

  • Kosher salt
  • 1 Pack [k] Lobster imitation
  • 1 small shallot, finely chopped
  • Juice of 1/2 fresh lemon
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil plus more for drizzling
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped celery leaves
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
  • Salt and Pepper
  1. Whisk shallot, lemon juice, and mustard in a medium bowl. Gradually whisk in 2 tablespoons oil; season dressing with kosher salt and pepper. Add [k]lobster meat, celery leaves, and dill; toss gently to coat. Cover and chill until cold, about 1 hour.
  2. Divide soup among bowls and top with lobster salad. Drizzle with oil and season with sea salt and pepper.

 

A Feast of Berries and Nice: Pt 2

13 Jun

And our Strawberry extravaganza continues…

Final1

You know what my big dilemma is when it comes to Summer? The Farmer’s Market is brimming with all sorts of tasty delights, and it’s literally a 10 minute walk from my house. However, this is also the time where there are about 10,000 fun and exciting things to do every weekend, and many of them involve me traveling (weddings, festivals, concerts, lakes, beer excursions, etc) over the weekend. Needless to say, I’m having Farmer’s Market guilt since I haven’t been able to take much advantage of the bounty held mere blocks from my house. However, I was still able to pair this with my delightful produce-packed meal last week (and it even coincided with the Red Wedding during Game of Thrones, who could have matched that up so perfectly??).

So, without further ado, I present to you the second Strawberry-inspired post this month:

Strawberry Jam Biscuits – Yvette Van Boven }

You know what stresses me out about that title? Biscuits. Fellow blogger The Food and Wine Hedonist recently posted about why baking is a lot more stress-inducing than cooking, and I couldn’t agree more. Any time I’ve made scones on here I feel like I go into an hour-long rant about over-mixing and blah blah blah, but you know what? Over-mixing and blah blah blah! You know what’s worse than throwing away something you’ve spent minutes (and possibly hours) creating? Remembering that you also spent money on all the ingredients. Yes, baking ingredients are traditionally relatively cheap (flour, sugar, baking powder/soda, salt, water), but remember, I’m the type of gal that will stop mid-run to pick up pennies. And when I don’t have a pocket in my shorts, I’ll carry that red cent all the way home, and triumphantly announce said money to anyone in the near vicinity.

Sidenote: one time at a movie theatre John, my sister Jessica and I were waiting in line to get tickets. Jessica and I both locked eyes on a nickel that was on the ground about 2 feet away from us and started a mad dash to be the first to pick it up. Before either of us could get our grubby fingers on it, John took a casual side step to conceal the five cent piece under his foot. He then gave us a “are you seriously competing for a nickel” glare. He just doesn’t get it. But suddenly something happened, the ticket counter person was calling “next in line” which was us. What to do. We each paused for an uncomfortably long time, hoping John would remove his shoe from our monetary prize before we could purchase our tickets. Alas, he firmly stood his ground, and we had to make the heroic decision to go purchase our tickets to continue the flow of movie traffic. That was 3 years ago. I still often think about what could have been… So yes, I’m cheap, that’s what I’m getting at.

With the weight of messing up these biscuits on the shoulders, I decided to embark on this project, just to prove to myself I could do it. I started with the non-baking portion first: home made jam.

Jamm

 

Well, I’m never buying jam again, this is so easy, tasty, and idiot proof, it’s crazy. You take strawberries and sugar, cook them for about 12 minutes, then stir in some lime zest and lime juice. Boom, you’ve been jammed. I decided to add some blueberries to the mix since I had them and I like questioning authority, man.

While letting your jam cool, take a deep breath and start your biscuits. CAREFULLY mix/sift your dry ingredients together (flour, sugar, baking powder, salt) and then add some lime zest and PRECISELY cut chilled butter cubes

ButterLime

 

Here’s the tricky part: use your fingertips to mix the butter into the dry ingredients, but DON’T over mix it. It needs to be like a coarse, sandy texture. Don’t stress out though, I mean, it’s not like if you over-mix it you can’t go back and fix it…oh wait.

BiscuitMix

There’s something kind of vulgar about that .gif isn’t there?

Now add your buttermilk, and mix with a fork until the dough resembles something “shaggy” looking

Dought

Oh my god, that doesn’t look shaggy. What have I done!? Now the fun part (if you haven’t had a panic attack yet): roll out GENTLY and cut your biscuit circles with an inverted glass

GlassCut

 

Put your little deflated circles on a baking sheet, give them a good thumbing in the middle and a heavy-handed sprinkle of sugar. It’s Jam time.

Jamming

 

Don’t let the false hope fill you up while these are baking, because your home will smell AMAZING during the 18-22 minutes these are baking. Moment of truth time:

Biscuits

 

I don’t think it’s possible for me to have a shot without some type of beer in the background. Hmm.

So as you can see, they look DELIGHTFUL, however, not puffy and flaky like a biscuit should be. I hereby change the name of these to Strawberry Jam COOKIES, because these things are sweet, tasty, and very satisfying. Just not….biscuity.

Final

 

And I’m sorry about all the animated pictures. I’m one step away from 90s chic with the tail that forms on your cursor when you navigate around the site, or, you know, I could go with the classic toaster with wings…

 

Strawberry Jam Biscuits – Yvette Van Boven via Bon Appetit }

Strawberry Jam

  • 12 ounces fresh strawberries, hulled, halved or quartered if large (about 3 cups)
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lime zest
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  1. Cook strawberries and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until jamlike in consistency, 12–15 minutes. Remove from heat; stir in lime zest and juice. Pour into a shallow bowl and let cool.

Biscuits

  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour plus more
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • 1 large egg, beaten to blend
  • 1 tablespoon raw sugar
  • Vanilla ice cream (for serving)
  1. Preheat oven to 400°. Whisk sugar, baking powder, salt, and 2 1/4 cups flour in a large bowl. Add butter and lime zest and blend with your fingertips until coarse crumbs form. Add buttermilk and, using a fork, mix until just combined. Transfer to a lightly floured surface. Gently knead just until a shaggy, moist dough forms, about 4 times.
  2. Roll out dough about 1/2-inch thick. Using a 2 1/2-inch biscuit cutter or inverted glass, cut out rounds. Gather scraps and repeat rolling and cutting until all dough is used.
  3. Place biscuits on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Using your thumb, make a large divot in the center of each biscuit; brush with egg and sprinkle liberally with raw sugar. Spoon a scant 1 teaspoon strawberry jam into each divot.
  4. Bake biscuits until golden brown, 18–22 minutes. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream, if using, and remaining jam.

 

 

 

Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market Feature: A-Picklin’ Bonanza

3 Jun

Board

Well well well, guess who’s featured on the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market blog again? Obviously it’s me because why would I non self-promote (I’m looking’ out for #1).

Pickled Market Veggies with Whitefish Spread – Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market

We have a new season full of fresh new veggies, and I thought “let’s brine ’em”, and brine ’em I did. I picked up some AMAZING Whitefish Spread from Bay Port Fish and decided to create a board around that (I was also fresh off my Charcuterie Board high). I was going to do asparagus, radishes, and swiss chard stems, but only ended up doing the first two because I wanted to make sure the brines were different enough for each type.

Once you start making fresh refrigerator pickles…there’s no stopping you.

  • Make a mixture of vinegar and water
  • Add some salt, sugar, and spices
  • Bring to a boil
  • Pour over desired vegetables
  • Let cool to room temperature
  • Pop in fridge for 48(ish) hours
  • Say “oh THESE pickled [vegetable name], no, they’re HOMEmade, I’m what you’d call a purist” while enjoying with an unsuspecting guest (however, don’t expect them to want to hang out with you again, this pickling knowledge has gone to your head!)

You can really play with the brine by selecting different types of vinegar (apple cider vinegar will give it a sweetness, while red wine vinegar will give it nice tang), and the herbs/spices you put in will also give great influence (you can go for classic dill, or maybe pair some cilantro and rice vinegar for an Asiany flair). And don’t forget, a pinch (or fistful) of crushed red pepper is always a nice addition for those who are into the spicy arts.

Final

 

To get the full recipes, check it out, and if you find yourself at the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market, grab some of that Whitefish Spread because day-um, it was soooooo good.

Local Celebrity

22 Mar

 
OneDo you see that? It’s Bacon and Pea Shoot Soup [drool]

It’s a special soup I made from ingredients from the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market….FOR the Ann Arbor Farmer’s Market Blog. You can find the article here.

The story behind the recipe: I went to the market a week in advance to scope out the produce to create a fun recipe (I did this at the tail end of a morning run, equipped with a credit card shoved in my running pants butt-pocket). I saw lots of greens, root vegetables, and sausages, so I thought “veggie-heavy cassoulet, BOOM, Erica, you’ve done it again”. Once I was done browsing I stopped at Durham’s Tracklements and Smokery for some smoked salmon, and jogged over to Zingerman’s Deli to grab some bagels (paying with my sweaty butt-credit card, mind you). Nothing says “cool” like jogging a half mile home in head to toe running gear and holding a bag of smoked fish. It made for a delightful breakfast for many days to come.

Bagel

However, when I made my way to the market the next week to assemble the dish, almost all the items I had seen the previous week were not there. Crestfallen. I was almost inconsolable until I saw the pea-shoots (which make a DELICIOUS, healthy, and expensive snack if you feel so inclined). After doing about 3 more awkward circles through the booths I came up with the recipe (which, again, you can find here)

 

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